The GovLab SCAN – New Happenings in Internet Governance

A weekly “Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance” (SCAN). Feel free to share your suggestions with us at SCAN@thegovlab.org.

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  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 79 - Highlights from this week’s Internet governance SCAN: The FCC’s net neutrality rule officially took effect on Friday, June 12, despite efforts by telecommunications companies to delay the implementation; The French data protection watchdog ordered Google to delist links from all Google domains (not just Google.fr), within 15 days, in accordance with the right to be forgotten rule.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 78 - Highlights from this week’s Internet governance SCAN: A new briefing by Amnesty International and Privacy International lays out a 7-point plan for the post-Snowden revelations era, with recommendations for legal and policy reform, corporate due diligence, and international standards; The Paraguayan Senate defeated a mandatory data retention bill that would have compelled local ISPs to retain communications and location details of every user for a period of 12 months; Last Sunday night, the provisions of the Patriot Act that allowed the National Security Agency (NSA) to conduct a bulk data collection program expired. The future of the program will be decided this week by the Senate.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 77 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The first report by the new United Nations Special Rapporteur calls on States to protect privacy and freedom of expression as well as to promote strong encryption and anonymity; CEO of ICANN Fadi Chehade urged participation in the NTIA transition process and stated that “Should the transition fail, the United States could lose credibility in its quest to maintain an open, multi-stakeholder-driven Internet.”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 76 - Highlights from this week’s Internet governance SCAN: ICANN officials announced that CEO Fadi Chehade will be leaving the organization in March 2016 prior to the IANA transition; Pew Research Center released a new report on Americans' privacy perceptions and behaviors; key findings include that 93% of Americans say it's important to be in control of who can get information about them; European Union ambassadors indicated that they will implement stiffer fines against companies that violate Europe’s ‘right to be forgotten’ law, giving data protection authorities more effective enforcement measures.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 75 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The U.S. House of Representatives voted to end the National Security Agency (NSA) practice of bulk phone data collection. The future of this practice will now be determined by the Senate, sometime before June 1 when the related provision of the Patriot Act is set to expire; In Bangladesh, extremists murdered Ananta Bijoy Das, the third blogger to be murdered in the country this year; China’s State Council announced that China will speed up the development of its broadband network and that telecommunications firms must increase urban broadband speeds by 40% while also cutting prices.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 74 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: Marietje Schaake, a member of the European Parliament for the Dutch Democratic Party, discusses “a new social compact” put forth by the Global Commission on Internet Governance; The European Commission presented the EU Digital Market Strategy, a roadmap for EU member states for issues such as e-commerce and geo-blocking; The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit issued a ruling that “the bulk collection of Americans’ phone metadata” by the National Security Agency (NSA) was not authorized by the Patriot Act.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 73 - Highlights from this week’s Internet governance SCAN: The Burundi government blocked messaging services WhatsApp and Viber in response to anti-government presentations; The Constitutional Court of the Slovak Republic ruled that mass surveillance of its citizens is unconstitutional; An updated law tackling online piracy came into effect on May 1st in Russia, giving authorities the power to tell Internet companies to take down sites accused of harboring pirated content without a court order.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 72 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: German newspapers Der Spiegel and Die Zeit reported that German intelligence (the BND) allowed the National Security Agency (NSA) “to spy on European -- and German -- companies and citizens”; The French government and five major technology companies reached an agreement to “help speed the removal of extremist content from the Internet, and set up a permanent working group that will meet to discuss further cooperation”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 71 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: This was a big week for net neutrality in India, where “Save the Internet” was trending and several organizations came out in support of net neutrality and withdrew their participation and/or association with zero rating initiatives such as Facebook’s Internet.org and Bharti Airtel’s Airtel Zero; The Global Commission on Internet Governance held the fourth annual Global Conference on Cyberspace (GCCS). The event focused on cyber freedom, safety and security, and had a particular focus on surveillance and its chilling effect on human rights
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 70 - Highlights from this week’s Internet governance SCAN: At the Turkish government's request, Twitter and Google complied with blocking URLs relating to an Istanbul prosecutor being killed, including tweets and YouTube videos; The Hamburg Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, Johannes Casper, ordered Google to “comply with German data protection law and give users more control over their data”; A new report analyzes a new tool of attack termed “China’s great cannon” that is “separate from, but co-located with, the Great Firewall of China” and involves weaponizing users to enforce censorship
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 69 - Highlights from this week’s Internet governance SCAN: The Inaugural Coordination Council meeting of the NETmundial Initiative was held on March 31. The group “released a draft Terms of Reference (ToR) document for a public comment period from April 1- May 1, 2015”, and reviewed project proposals submitted on the platform to date; A report released by a Belgian data protection agency this week detailed how “Facebook tracks the web browsing of everyone who visits a page on its site even if the user does not have an account or has explicitly opted out of tracking in the EU”, seemingly in violation of EU privacy law
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 68 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The annual RightsCon conference was held on March 24th-25th in Manila in the Philippines, and brought together people from over 50 countries who were “committed to extending the digital rights of users around the world, and fighting for the open internet”; The Indian Supreme Court struck down a law that criminalized several forms of online expression in a “defining moment for freedom of expression for the country.”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 67 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The French Interior Ministry blocked five websites deemed to promote terrorism, sparking concerns about freedom of expression; Reuters is the most recent website to be blocked in China. Great Fire, a website that monitors blocked websites in China was also under fire from a strong DDOS attack this week. Many suspect the attack was initiated by the government; The Global Commission on Internet Governance released a report that describes digital intelligence and promotes international norms in this area.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 66 - Highlights from this week’s Internet governance SCAN: US Federal Communications Commission (F.C.C.) released the full text of rules related to net neutrality in a 313-page document; The UK Parliament released a report that found it is “technologically infeasible” to block encryption sites like Tor
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 65 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The White House released a 24-page draft of the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights Act of 2015 outlining “the steps companies need to take to tell people what data they’re collecting and what they’re doing with that information"; A Brazilian appeals court judge reversed an earlier decision to suspend WhatsApp in the country in response to the company’s unwillingness to comply with investigations into content that involved children and teenagers. The original decision was justified using the Brazilian Civil Rights Framework for the Internet called Marco Civil; UNESCO released a draft study at the international multistakeholder conference CONNECTing the Dots this week. The study “presents a compilation of current trends, views and positions in current debates on the Internet related issues within the mandate of UNESCO.”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 64 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: On Thursday, the FCC voted to regulate the Internet as a public utility under Title II. The decision follows a yearlong debate and public comment period about the best rules to ensure an Open Internet; Günther Oettinger, the European Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, called for a unified European data-protection law to counter the practice of major US Internet companies using legal loopholes to gather and sell personal data. ; the Senate held a hearing on the IANA transition called “Preserving the Multistakeholder Model of Internet Governance”; several tech companies have also added their support to the IANA transition.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 63 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The Global Network of Internet and Society Research Centers (NoC) and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society have released a new paper, Governance of Online Intermediaries: Observations from a Series of National Case Studies, that examines online intermediary liability through the use of case studies covering issues and frameworks in Brazil, the European Union, India, South Korea, the United States, Thailand, Turkey, and Vietnam; Lenovo has come under fire for shipping Windows computers preloaded with hidden adware dubbed Superfish, which exposed Lenovo users to man-in-the-middle attacks; AT&T has rolled out high speed fiber-to-home Internet service in Kansas City for $70 a month; however, customers will have to pay an additional $29 per month to opt out of AT&T using their data for advertising. The articles AT&T charges $29 for privacy. Time for others to do the same and Don’t let AT&T mislead you about its $29 “privacy fee” provide two viewpoints on this controversial move by AT&T.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 62 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: ICANN’s 52nd Public Meeting took place this week in Singapore; you can read more details on the sessions and archival recordings here; Several companies including Symantec, Intel Security and Fortinet as well as Sony and Microsoft’s video game divisions have agreed to share customer data with the US Government for purposes of national security; A recent report on Internet freedom in Russia found that “the number of cases where citizens’ Internet freedom was limited in the country increased 1.5-fold in 2014.” Russia’s lower house of Parliament has also proposed further restrictions; according to Russian MP Leonid Levin,“access to anonymization and circumvention tools such as TOR, VPNs and even web proxies, needs to be restricted.”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 61 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: In preparation for ICANN 52 which will be held in Singapore from February 08-12, information has been released on the agenda and sessions, including the schedule for the Global Domains Division (GDD) Sessions, also see notes from the pre-ICANN 52 Policy Update Webinar; Tom Wheeler, the Chairman of the US Federal Communications Commission, put forth his stance on net neutrality, proposing that the FCC ““use its Title II authority to implement and enforce open Internet protections.”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 60 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: On Tuesday, the US Federal Communications Commission made a significant revision to its definition of broadband, changing the standard to downloads of 25 megabits a second and uploads of 3 megabits a second from earlier speeds of 4 Mbps downloads and 1 Mbps uploads; Civil society organizations from around the world launched the Internet Social Forum (ISF), a group with a mission to create a “participatory bottom-up space for all those who believe that the global Internet must evolve in the public interest.” The group began as a response to the World Economic Forum’s Net Mundial Initiative; The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is poised to make a decision on net neutrality in the near future, and in The One Loophole to Rule Them All, Marvin Ammori warns that telecommunications companies will lobby to put a loophole in the FCC’s rule. Also, in Before Net Neutrality: The Surprising 1940s Battle for Radio Freedom, Annenberg Professor Victor Pickard opines that “how this debate plays out may determine whether we follow the path of broadcasting or begin to create a media system worthy of its democratic promise.”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 59 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: UNESCO launched a new series of publications on Internet freedom. “Fostering Freedom Online: the Role of Internet Intermediaries” is the first issue in this series, in a joint initiative with the Open Society Foundations, the Internet Society, and the Center for Global Communication Studies at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication. The study examines “this recent historical phenomenon and how it impacts on freedom of expression and associated fundamental rights such as privacy”; U.S. President Barack Obama gave his annual State of the Union speech, in which he laid out his plan to increase access to high-speed broadband. The President’s address also reiterated his commitment to a free and open Internet, and announced new proposals to “better meet the evolving threat of cyberattacks, combat identity theft, and protect our children’s information.”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 58 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: Following the terrorist attacks in Paris last week, multiple European Union member states are considering introducing new information-collection and reporting policies. Notably, UK Prime Minister David Cameron has proposed denying terrorists a “safe space” to communicate by cracking down on encrypted communications; U.S. President Barack Obama made a series of cyber-related announcements this week (leading up to the State of the Union speech on January 20), including revisions to the 2011 Cybersecurity Legislative Proposal, a new Consumer Bill of Rights, a Student Digital Privacy Act, and revisions to broadband competition policies in the form of “community-based broadband solutions”; The Global Network of Internet and Society Research Centers (NoC) and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University have released “Multistakeholder as Governance Groups: Observations from Case Studies”.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 57 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: With regards to the IANA functions stewardship transition, the IANA Coordination Group (ICG) requires that a final proposal be received by mid-January. Commentators are increasingly of the opinion that this leaves too little time to complete a September 2015 transition, especially because progress on the ICANN accountability process (on whose outputs the IANA transition depends) is expected to take longer.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 56 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The GovLab has released a new research paper, "Innovations in Global Governance: Toward a Distributed Governance Ecosystem", focusing on enabling a global and distributed Internet governance ecosystem. The paper is part of a series under the Global Commission for Internet Governance (GCIG); The NETmundial Initiative has announced the formation of its inaugural Coordination Council, with 20 members; Following the widely-publicized hacks on Sony Pictures Entertainment and subsequent attempts to identify the hackers responsible, cybersecurity is set to be one of the most important issues in Internet governance for 2015; January 15 is the target deadline for the IANA functions' three operational communities (names, numbers, and protocol parameters) to respond to the ICG Request for Transition Proposals.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 55 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: Last week, the United States House of Representatives approved the "2015 Consolidated Appropriations Package", funding the U.S. government through 2015. Section 520 of the $1.1 trillion spending bill specifically prohibits the U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) from spending any funds on the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) Functions stewardship transition; The Pew Research Center has released its latest report, "The Future of Privacy"; According to the United States government, Sony Pictures' computers were hacked this week by North Korea, apparently in response to the release of "The Interview", a Hollywood movie that depicts the assassination of the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 54 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The United Nations Third Committee of the General Assembly adopted a resolution on the right to privacy in the digital age, brought to the UN by Brazil and Germany; The Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe has released an Issue Paper on The rule of law on the Internet and in the wider digital world, with important conclusions and recommendations.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 53 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The ICANN Cross Community Working Group (CWG) on Naming Functions has published its draft proposal for the IANA Stewardship Transition. Public comment is open from December 1 – 22, 2014; A bill has been introduced in the U.S. Congress titled the “Defending Internet Freedom Act of 2014“; The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has released the Measuring the Information Society Report, which “features key ICT data and benchmarking tools to measure the information society.”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 52 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The Internet Society (ISOC) Board this week expressed concern regarding the recently launched NETmundial Initiative, especially with regards to the principles of its founding and its role in the larger decentralized Internet governance ecosystem; China this week held its first global Internet conference - the World Internet Conference - in Wuzhen, Zhejiang Province, spawning much commentary that China intends to promote its own domestic Internet rules as a model for global Internet governance; The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) this week held a cyber defence exercise involving 400 experts who aimed to “test the ability of the participating nations to coordinate a defence against a series of targeted cyber incidents involving a NATO mission network”.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 51 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Plenipotentiary Conference concluded last week. No major resolutions were passed that would give the ITU a greater role in regulating the non-technical aspects of the Internet. Significantly, an amended resolution “will increase the ITU's involvement in the Internet's global development and the transition of Internet governance toward participation by all stakeholders”; President Obama this week made an official announcement regarding net neutrality, urging the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to create new rules for a "free and open Internet", including: “no blocking”, “no throttling”, “increased transparency”, and “no paid prioritization”; The NETmundial Initiative has released its first blog post describing ways to join the discussion and get involved in available opportunities.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 50 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: ICANN, the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br), and the World Economic Forum (WEF) have launched the NETmundial Initiative, whose purpose is to "provide an open, generative, and collaborative space, inviting permission-less innovation to build and deliver distributed Internet governance enablers and solutions".
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 49 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Plenipotentiary Meeting is ongoing in Busan, South Korea. Countries are now negotiating specific resolutions, for example around cybersecurity, the transition from IPv4 to IPv6, and the institutional mandate of the ITU; The Hungarian government recently proposed the taxation of Internet access, drawing tens of thousands of protestors in Hungary.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 48 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) is currently holding its Plenipotentiary Meeting in Busan, South Korea. See the live webcast here. The ITU meeting will be held from October 20 - November 7; topics of significance include ITU's role in Internet governance and cybersecurity, ITU's constitution and transparency, and the selection of a new Secretary-General for the ITU.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 47 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker made opening remarks at the Opening Ceremony of ICANN’s 51st meeting in Los Angeles this week, highlighting the importance of current Internet governance discussions to the U.S. government; The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) is holding its Plenipotentiary Meeting in Busan, South Korea, next week. The meeting will discuss issues that may significantly impact the Internet, as well as the way organizations coordinate the governance of the Internet.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 46 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: ICANN’s 51st meeting will begin next week in Los Angeles, California. Topics of particular significance include the IANA Stewardship Transition, and the Enhancing ICANN Accountability Process; U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder has argued that increased encryption can make it harder for law enforcement to collect evidence; The European Union may soon have two new digital commissioners - Andrus Ansip and Günther Oettinger - replacing Neelie Kroes, whose term as EU Commissioner for the Digital Agenda is ending.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 45 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The Global Network of Interdisciplinary Internet & Society Research Centers (NoC) this week held the Evolution of the Internet Governance Ecosystem event (the Torino Symposium), bringing together academics to “examin[e] existing and potential models of distributed and collaborative governance with the goal of informing the evolution of - and current debate around - the Internet governance ecosystem in light of the NETmundial Roadmap and the work of various forums, panels, and committees”.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 44 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: 16 European member states have issued a joint declaration calling on European officials to adopt a legislative package reforming personal data protection by 2015; The bipartisan Law Enforcement Access to Data Stored Abroad Act (LEADS Act) introduced last week proposes that if the U.S. government wanted to access non-U.S. citizens’ data stored overseas, it “would have to follow the legal process of the nation where the servers reside”.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 43 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The International Telecommunications Unions (ITU)’s Plenipotentiary Conference is fast approaching (October 20 – November 7, 2014). This is a key event in which ITU Member States decide on the future role of the organization –including the ITU’s remit regarding Internet governance; The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has received a record 3 million comments in response to its Open Internet ruling (regulating net neutrality and “paid prioritization”).
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 42 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The 9th Internet Governance Forum (IGF) concluded last week, spurring much subsequent commentary about the current state of global Internet governance. This year, the usual discussion topics and participants at the IGF "leaked" into other fora --for example, the World Economic Forum/NETmundial Initiative and the Internet Ungovernance Forum-- and some have observed that these leaks undermine the role of the IGF as a global discussion forum for Internet governance; Google is holding a series of meetings in European legislators in European capitals to discuss the implications of the EU "Right to be Forgotten" ruling; IFEX has released a glossary of Internet governance terms; The U.S. State Department has launched an Open Internet campaign.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 41 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The 9th annual Internet Governance Forum (IGF) took place in Istanbul, Turkey this week; The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is focusing on reducing anti-competition policies this week in what is viewed as a significant position statement with regards to net neutrality debates; The U.S. Congress will deliberate on two privacy bills when Congress resumes on September 8: The USA FREEDOM Act –currently holding widespread support- and CISA (Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act) –a bill that is currently very controversial.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 40 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: This week the NETmundial Initiative launched at the World Economic Forum in Geneva. The Initiative is intended to “contribute to the broader international effort to advance multistakeholder Internet governance on the basis of the NETmundial principles”; The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) begins next week (September 2 – 5). The 2014 IGF will focus on many topics, including the IANA Stewardship Transition, the purpose and goals of the NETmundial Initiative, and issues such as privacy, security, access, and Internet technologies.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 39 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The ninth annual Internet Governance Forum (IGF) will take place from September 2 – 5, 2014; ICANN has released a proposed revision to its Bylaws that would require a two-thirds majority vote for the ICANN Board to reject Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) advice.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 38 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: Several articles this week discuss the possibility of “fundamentally redesigning the Internet”. This is in response to continuous incidents of Internet technologies used for purposes that were originally unintended and potentially harmful to Internet users; ICANN has released a draft organizational structure for its “Strengthening ICANN Governance and Accountability track” (the “accountability update”). The proposed structure has been criticized for lacking transparency in its development and for the “Board-appointed advisors” which are part of the proposed structure.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 37 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: A U.S. federal judge has ruled that Microsoft must give U.S. law enforcement access to data it holds overseas in Ireland; A new proposal by the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) articulates principles for an enhanced ICANN accountability framework.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 36 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: ICANN’s response to a situation involving the transference of country-code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs) –specifically those of Iran, Syria, and North Korea—sheds light on the idea of TLDs as “property” and poses interesting questions for domain name registries; Following disclosures of U.S. surveillance practices, the European Union is re-thinking the Safe Harbor Agreement, which enables U.S. and EU companies to transfer data between each other’s borders without running afoul of data protection laws; There is a new version of the USA FREEDOM Act that the U.S. Senate will vote on –the Act has significant implications for privacy and surveillance in the U.S.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 35 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The IANA Transition Stewardship Coordination Group held its first meeting in London on July 17 – 19. The group released its Draft Charter which describes its single deliverable as “a proposal to the U.S. Commerce Department National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) regarding the transition of NTIA’s stewardship of the IANA functions to the Internet community” and its mission as “the development of a proposal among the communities affected by the IANA functions”.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 34 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: Two significant legal developments in the privacy and surveillance sphere are being debated this week –the Cyber Information Sharing Act (CISA) within the United States, and the Data Retention and Invesigations Powers (DRIP) Act within the United Kingdom. Critics fear both expand the surveillance powers of the state; ICANN’s accountability is under global scrutiny with a proposal by the civil society Just Net Coalition for the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) to come up with a “new model for Internet governance”, and the French Senate publishing a proposal for a remodeled Internet Governance Forum (IGF) and a remodeled ICANN.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 33 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: Digital Venice is a conference focused on digital development in Europe held this week in Venice, Italy. Focus topics include how to invest in ICT infrastructure in Europe using both public and private funds, and particularly how to leverage the European Single Market to promote digital competition and innovation in Europe.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 32 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: ICANN’s 50th public meeting concluded this week. Topics of particular focus included the transition of the NTIA’s stewardship of the IANA functions; ICANN’s accountability update; and issues arising from the new gTLD program; Issues of privacy and cybersecurity have led to a shift in the global data services marketplace, with a trend away from using U.S.-based companies; The World Summit on the Information Society +10 High-Level Event concluded this week, producing two outcome documents –one reviewing ICT developments in the past decade, and one laying out a vision for ICT development in the next decade.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 31 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: ICANN’s 50th public meeting is underway in London; In privacy developments, Canada’s Supreme Court has ruled that the voluntary sharing of Internet service provider subscriber information is unconstitutional; and a U.S. appeals court has ruled that law enforcement agencies must obtain warrants to collect cellphone location data; In the U.S., the House Judiciary Committee has passed a bill permanently banning the taxation of Internet access; meanwhile, the Federal Communications Commission will study the impact on consumers of how Internet service providers exchange traffic with other networks.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 30 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: The World Summit on the Information Society +10 High-Level Event took place this week in Geneva, Switzerland. The event took stock of Internet communications technology (ICT) development in the past decade and will develop a vision for ICT development in the next decade, with a particular focus on bridging the digital divide; ICANN’s 50th public meeting takes place June 22nd to 26th in London, England. The meeting will cover a wide range of topics, including the NTIA-IANA stewardship transition and the ICANN “accountability update”, as well as the new gTLD program; Privacy issues continue to gain great attention worldwide, with the release of Vodafone’s transparency report this week, the European Court of Justice’s ruling that copies of webpages made during web-browsing do not infringe copyright law, and ICANN’s recent report on Whois and gTLD directory systems regarding domain name registrant data
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 29 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: This week marks one year since the Snowden revelations of mass surveillance practices by the National Security Agency (NSA) were first disclosed; The Reset the Net campaign launched on June 5th; Google has released a form in response to the EU ruling on the “right to forget” –the right for EU citizens to have search results removed if they are deemed in violation of their privacy.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 28 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: International Internet technology companies face conflicting jurisdictional issues that can act as obstacles to the growth of the Internet and its potential to connect people. For example EU data protection regulations may contradict certain ICANN registrar/registry policies, creating legal challenges for companies that operate in both regions; The global supply of IPv4 addresses is steadily declining and ICANN is therefore pushing for Internet companies to quickly coordinate the global transition to using IPv6 addresses; The Stockholm Internet Forum –whose theme was “Internet – privacy, transparency, surveillance, and control” has just concluded. The World Summit on the Information Society +10 High-Level Event (WSIS +10) takes place from June 10 – 13 in the International Telecommunications Union headquarters in Geneva.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 27 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: The U.S. House of Representatives has passed the USA Freedom Act, intended to reform government surveillance practices –especially the practice of bulk collection of phone records. However, technology companies and advocacy groups originally in support of the bill have retracted their support because of changes to the bill’s language that could maintain bulk data collection practices; The Global Panel on Internet Cooperation and Governance Mechanisms has published its final report, titled “Towards a Collaborative, Decentralized Internet Governance Ecosystem”.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 26 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has voted to move forward with new proposed “Open Internet” rules; In Europe, the European Court of Justice has ruled that individuals have the right to ask search engines such as Google to remove search results to information about them that they do not want to have found; ICANN has closed the public comment period for the proposed IANA transition process and accompanying scoping document; The U.S. House Energy and Commerce committee has approved the Domain Openness through Continued Oversight Matters (DOTCOM) Act.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 25 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: ICANN has launched two interrelated processes –one which will examine ICANN’s accountability structures, and the other which is to develop a proposal for transitioning stewardship of the IANA functions to the “global multistakeholder community”; The White House last week published two reports concerning big data. Both are significant for raising privacy protections concerns around how data is collected, stored, and used, and for adding further momentum to larger discussions of online freedom in the U.S. and elsewhere; Following the outcome document –the Multistakeholder Statement of São Paulo—of the NETmundial meeting, many Internet governance actors are in the process of developing more concrete plans for action, especially with regards to a “roadmap for the future of Internet governance”.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 24 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: Following the NETmundial Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance held in São Paulo, Brazil last week, a range of participants and Internet stakeholders have published their opinions regarding the outcomes of the meeting; There is a great deal of public backlash against the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) new Open Internet proposal (following a strike-down of its previous Open Internet proposal by a federal appeals court in January); ICANN has launched an “accountability update” process as a parallel and interdependent process to the process of creating the IANA transition proposal.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 23 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: The NETmundial Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance took place this week in São Paulo, Brazil. Thousands of different individuals from all over the world contributed to the meeting’s organization and planning; the meeting’s draft outcome documents received 1370 comments online; and 1480 stakeholders from the private, governmental, technical, academic, and civil society communities of 97 nations came together during the meeting, joined by remote participants from 30 remote participation hubs. The meeting produced a non-binding outcome document that is meant to inform all upcoming Internet governance discussions [...]
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 22 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: The NETMundial Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance will take place next week in São Paulo, Brazil (April 23 – 24). The meeting’s Executive Multistakeholder Committee (EMC) has released a draft outcomes document for the meeting, which is open for public comment; ICANN has released a draft proposal for the process of creating a transition plan for the oversight of the IANA functions. U.S. Republicans have brought the issue to the fore with several proposed bills that seek to delay or deny the transition.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 21 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: ICANN 49 had as one of its focus topics the IANA transition, for which ICANN presented a framework of each of the IANA functions, as well as the actors who create policy for those functions, as well as the actors that actually implement those function, and finally the actors that ensure the accountability and oversight for those functions. This transition framework has prompted a wide range of discussion regarding the roles of different actors around the IANA functions, and in particular the role of ICANN; With the NETMundial Meeting in Brazil fast approaching (it begins on April 23rd), a variety of commentators have published reports calling for specific topics and issues to be focused on in the meeting agenda. In particular, there is a widespread desire to separate principles from practice, so that discussions are not just theoretical but also focus on the real concerns of real actors.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 20 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: The U.S. government announcement regarding transitioning oversight structures for ICANN and for the IANA functions continues to generate a great deal of coverage and discussion around the world. Notably, there is a marked divide in opinion around the transition --for example, leaders of most technical organizations have embraced the announcement, while U.S. republicans are actively seeking ways to prevent the transition from happening too quickly, or from happening at all; ICANN held its 49th meeting this week in Singapore. Important topics included the design of a transition plan for the oversight of ICANN and the IANA functions; the outputs of the ICANN Strategy Panels and how these will inform ICANN’s 5-Year Strategic Plan; and various issues related to ICANN’s new gTLD program.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 19 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: Last week, the United States government, through the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) of the Department of Commerce, released an official announcement declaring its intention to transition away from being the steward of the Domain Name System through contract with ICANN. The NTIA has called on ICANN to “convene the global multistakeholder community in crafting a transition plan. The GovLab has compiled a special side-issue of the SCAN that deals exclusively with this announcement; ICANN49 in Singapore will begin this Sunday (March 23). The agenda includes general Supporting Organization/Advisory Committee policy-development activities, although there is also a heavy focus on global Internet governance (the crafting of a transition plan), ICANN’s strategic planning process and the Strategy Panels, and also ICANN’s global stakeholder engagement activities.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Special Issue – Reactions to the NTIA Announcement on Globalizing IANA Functions - On Friday March 14th, the United States government, through the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) of the Department of Commerce, issued a formal announcement that it intends to transition key Internet domain name functions to the “global multistakeholder community.” The NTIA has historically contracted with the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) to […]
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 18 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The World Wide Web turned 25 this week. A proliferation of articles have been published describing the invention, historical development, and contemporary issues with the Web. Sir Tim-Berners Lee, who invented the World Wide Web, also launched the “web we want” campaign as well as the “web at 25” website, and has made calls for an “Internet bill of rights” to enshrine principles such as openness, freedom of expression online, and net neutrality; Several Internet stakeholder communities and individuals –including the “technical community”, various stakeholder groups in ICANN, and various governmental bodies (including the European Commission) have submitted position papers and recommendations (“content contributions”) leading up to NetMundial Brazil Meeting. Many of these contributions are available for reading online.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 17 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: A proposal has been made for how to globalize the IANA function. This is significant given the European Commission two weeks ago called for a roadmap of IANA function globalization; Several important meetings took place this week with regards to Internet governance. The Internet Engineering Task Force held its 89th meeting in London, discussing technical standards development. RightsCon was held in Silicon Valley, discussing digital rights and ICT sector risk.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 16 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: Various activities are underway or wrapping up at ICANN as the next ICANN meeting – ICANN 49 in Singapore – gets closer. For example, a Cross-Community Working Group on Internet Governance will be taking contributions leading up to the Brazil meeting; the ICANN Strategy Panels have released their reports; and ICANN has set up it’s President’s Globalization Advisory Groups. The ICANN Policy Staff will also be holding a Webinar before the Singapore meeting.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 15 - This week’s highlights: ICANN has set up six “Globalization Advisory Groups” which will address the following areas: the “Affirmation of Commitments ("AOC"), policy structures, legal structure, root server system, the IANA multistakeholder accountability, and Internet governance.” This is particularly relevant in light of recent European Commission requests to establish a “timeline for the globalization of ICANN.”
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 14 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance scan: The European Commission called for an acceleration of the globalization of ICANN and its functions, and in particular seeks to establish a timeline for this globalization; In the midst of national positioning around Internet governance, several “camps” have emerged, including the “multistakeholder camp,” the “multilateral camp,” and the “in-between camp.” Many warn that “intergovernmental” in these contexts means “for governments only.” The European Commission has also explicitly expressed that a new international legal instrument should not be instituted for Internet governance.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 13 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: Several countries, including Turkey, and groups of countries, such as the African Union, are in the process of developing rules and laws around cybersecurity and privacy. These proposed rules are being met with heavy criticism, particularly for being underdeveloped or for not accounting for the perspectives of all the relevant stakeholders; The Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance in Brazil is coming up in April and pre-registration is now open. The High Level Panel on Global Internet Cooperation and Governance Mechanisms will review its draft report this month, and the report will be presented at the Brazil Meeting and at the World Economic Forum in Dubai this coming May.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 12 - Highlights from this week's Internet governance SCAN: The gradual roll-out of ICANN’s new generic top-level domains program (new gTLD program) is increasingly visible globally, as more and more new gTLDs open for end-user registration. Associated with the new gTLD program are a variety of new and difficult questions, such as how contentions between gTLD applicants can be resolved, and how various TLDs should be used (for example, what the guidelines should be when ccTLDs are “commercialized”).
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 11 - Highlights from this week's Internet Governance SCAN: Global leaders are meeting at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. This year’s theme is “The Reshaping of the World: Consequences for Society, Politics and Business” and Internet governance is a high priority item on the agenda; Boston Consulting Group has released a report (commissioned by ICANN) on the sources of “e-friction” that impede economic growth through the Internet: infrastructure friction; industry friction; individual friction; and information friction.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 10 - Highlights from this week's Internet Governance SCAN: Internet governance and digital rights organizations are preparing agendas and statements to be made at a series of upcoming high-level Internet governance meetings, including the Brazil Meeting and the next meeting of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU); Today, President Obama has announced reforms to strengthen oversight of U.S. intelligence activities.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 9 - Highlights from this edition's Internet Governance SCAN: ICANN's new gTLD program continues to produce a variety of disputes, the details of which remain under discussion. In particular, Whois registration services will need to evolve and decisions need to be made regarding how to handle funds received from the program's "last resort auctions"; A multitude of high-level meetings around Internet governance are taking place in the next two years. Specifically, the Brazil Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance will take place April 23 - 24, 2014
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 8 - Highlights from this week's Internet Governance SCAN: The High Level Panel on Global Internet Cooperation met this week in London and expressed support for the multistakeholder model of Internet governance; Panel conversation will soon move to 1Net; The UN General Assembly Human Rights Committee issued a resolution protecting people’s right to privacy in cyberspace.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 7 - Highlights from this week's Internet Governance SCAN: Global trust in the Internet and in privacy/neutrality continues to erode, raising suspicion that many are documenting in the form of new content, e.g., video; Countries are getting serious about greater governmental involvement in Internet governance and conversations around "multilateralism" are emerging from the European Union to India to China.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 6 - This Internet governance SCAN includes highlights from the past two weeks due to the Thanksgiving holiday: ICANN held its ICANN48 meeting in Buenos Aires last week. The meeting focused largely on the following themes – ICANN’s role in the swelling international Internet governance debate; Implementing the new gTLD program; and How ICANN can best to take advantage of several initiatives, such as the upcoming Brazil Meeting and the 1Net initiative.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 5 - Highlights from this week's Internet Governance SCAN: The ICANN community met in Buenos Aires, Argentina for ICANN48, where much discussion centered on clarifying ICANN’s role in recent Internet governance initiatives, including the Brazilian Internet Summit planned for April 23-24, 2014 in São Paulo; ICANN announced the membership of a fifth, high-level strategy panel on the “Future of Global Internet Cooperation,” which will be chaired by President Toomas Ilves of Estonia and will hold its first convening on December 12-13, 2013 in London.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 4 - Highlights from this week's Internet Governance SCAN: ICANN's new gTLD program moves forward with the release of 9 new gTLDs, including the first in the Latin alphabet; Recapping the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) 88 meeting in Vancouver – attendees discussed post-Snowden Internet security protocols and the need to strengthen encryption.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 3 - Highlights from this week's Internet Governance SCAN: A free and open online forum about the future of Internet governance – 1Net – launched this week; ICANN has launched a new Whois database beta to test the one-stop shop approach to opening registered domain name data to the public in an effort to improve data accuracy and increase transparency and accountability.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Issue 2 - Highlights from this week's Internet Governance SCAN: The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) wrapped up last Friday in Bali. From this year’s event emerged uncertainty for the future of Internet governance and a lack of clarity among stakeholders on how many issues, such as surveillance and privacy, should be addressed going forward; Concerns and excitement around the upcoming April 2014 Brazil “Internet Summit” have emerged, though many questions on the details of the event remain.
  • The GovLab SCAN – Selected Curation of Articles on Net-Governance - Highlights from this week's Internet Governance SCAN: The majority of this week’s coverage focuses on defining and prioritizing challenges in Internet governance, and on the Internet Governance Forum (IGF 2013), which ends today in Bali, Indonesia; The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) also made strides in the implementation of its new generic top-level domain name (gTLD) program.
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